7/26/12

Freezer Meals: Corn on the Cob

how to freeze corn on the cob

There are a lot of different methods for freezing fresh corn on the cob. They almost all are great methods.  Today I'm going to share with you my quick & easy method that has worked for me for over 20 years.  I learned it from a farmer one year when he was delivering a load of corn  to a  food co-op I belonged in, who were splitting a truckload that had been fresh picked just hours before.

That farmer told me, if you really want to keep the corn on the cob as fresh as possible, leave the husks on, and bag it in freezer bags and get it in the freezer as soon as possible.  I asked him why not the need to blanch the corn in hot water first. He promised me that if the corn was super fresh, just picked, like at a farmers market, then leaving the husk on will work just fine, but if you are buying corn on the cob that might be a few weeks old, say from a traditional grocery store, than blanching it first will be better, as it has already lost flavor and color.

Blanching, which is cooking the corn on the cob in boiling water for 1-3 minutes will stop an enzyme that breaks down flavor and color. You then plunge the corn in ice water to stop the cooking process, and when it is cool you can cut it off the cob to freeze it or leave it on the cob and freeze it.  Most people will tell you that if you don't blanch it, you will lose flavor and color.  I do use this method if I find a great sale on corn from the store, but if I get some from a farm or farmers market, than I do this quick & easy method.

I have frozen them for up to 9 months and once cooked they still taste like fresh picked corn, but the key is to get them in the freezer as soon as you can after they've been picked.

Jan's Tip: See the bottom of the post for my favorite cooking trick! Comes out super delish, every single time, and super easy!


How to prepare corn for freezing:
Snap off the "handle" end of the corn.









Either pull, or snip off the tip with the silk tassels









If you want to you can peel off the first few "uglier" husks. but don't unpeel too much. This is only for cosmetic reasons. I peeled them off in the picture below.

I can fit 6 full sized ears in a gallon sized freezer bag.  Get as much air out of the bag as possible. Freeze for up to 6 months.












How to cook up the corn on the cob:
Pull the corn from the freezer 8 hours (I pull it in the morning, or night before) and store in refrigerator to thaw.
From here, you can cook it any old way you want. You can shuck all the husks and silks off first and boil, steam, or grill your corn or....

my favorite method:  Cook the corn in the oven right in their husks!
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Put corn with husks still on directly on the oven racks.
Cook for 30 minutes or until corn is soft.
Remove from oven, and carefully peel off the husks. The silks and husks will all just fall right off!  Butter and salt as desired!

19 comments:

  1. We don't eat a lot of corn, but my little one loves corn chowder and now is a great time to stock up!

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    1. My husband loves corn chowder. I have his grandmothers recipe, and forgot about it until now, thank you for reminding me!
      Hugs,
      Jan

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  2. Thanks for this! I'm in Iowa and this is totally applicable. I'll be buying a bunch of corn for later in the year!! :)

    http://munchtalk.blogspot.com/

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    1. Thanks Jasanna! I'm a Kansas Girl originally, so I know how much corn you've been seeing in Iowa! Thanks for stopping by!
      Jan

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  3. Originally from the Cornhusker State here -- great quick and easy way to freeze corn. Have not tried the oven trick -- will have to add that to my list! Thanks so much for sharing on Busy Monday!

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    1. Thanks Charlene, I love Pinch of Joy!
      Jan

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  4. We put ours on a microwave safe plate, & cook it in the shuck 4 minutes per ear. I don't cook more than 4 ears at a time. When they come out of the microwave use a pot holder because they are very hot. Pull the shucks off and all the silks come right off with the shucks. No mess no fuss. Easy.

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    Replies
    1. Love that! Easy Peasy! Thanks for sharing, I am going to try it next time I cook them up!
      Jan

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    2. Do you thaw the ears first with this microwave method?

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    3. Bonnie, I have tried it both ways. I increased the time for it though by an extra 1-2 minutes for the frozen ones and mine came out fine. You may need to just play with your microwave a time or two to get it just right.

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  5. just tried this (I had to blanch mine) and I was worried because all I had was tin foil to freeze them in... so I decided to try it and prep them the way I would normally so they're all ready to go on the grill out in the oven without having to unwrap for seasoning... success! Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. That sounds like a great idea! I love it! Thanks for sharing it, I may just have to try that this year.

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  6. Thanks. This is the first year I have ever grown corn and I am so glad to know that I can just pick and freeze

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    Replies
    1. Hope you have a bountiful harvest!
      Hugs
      Jan

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  7. Would you share your grandmothers chowder recipe, I love all the older recipes, will see if I can find some fresh corn to freeze this season, sounds like a great idea. Bill Dotson

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    Replies
    1. I'd be happy to share it! I'll dig it up out of my recipes and get it to you!
      Thanks for asking!
      Jan

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    2. Bill,
      I dug it out. I will make a post of the recipe this fall, but in the mean time here is the recipe exactly as it is handwritten by my grandmother. As usual, old recipes often need the directions firmed up a bit, but the fun part is giving it a try. I would think bacon could be substituted for the salt pork. Here is the exact recipe:
      3 slices salt pork cubed small and browned gently.
      1 onion cut fine and lightly browned in salt pork
      6 or 8 med. potatoes cubed
      3 c. water.
      Add salt pork, onions and potatoes to water in pan and cook till tender. Then add 3 cup. milk or cream, 3 Tablespoons butter, 1 or 2 cans cream style corn, salt and pepper to taste.
      To thicken chowder mix 4 Tablespoons flour with 1/4 cup water and add to soup, stir till thickened.
      Serves 5-6.

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    3. Sorry Bill it's my husbands grandmothers recipe not my grandmother, although I consider her mine too!
      I often make my own "cream style corn" by cutting the corn off the cobs and then scraping the cobs down really good, getting all that extra starch/pulp out of the cobs .
      adding in 1/4 cup butter, 1/2 tsp. salt/pepper, cook med. heat for about 1-2 minutes, then add in 1/3- 1/2 cup cream. heat till warmed through.
      ( I usually then use the remaining cream in my container, mix with milk for the 3 cups in the chowder recipe). Enjoy.
      ooohhh I should make this one a post too! thanks Bill!
      Best to you
      Jan

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    4. 4-5 ears of corn for cream style corn recipe above.

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